Collaborators

TIM GOEDEMÉ (CSB) is Senior Researcher at the Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, and coordinator of the TAKE project. He holds a doctorate in social sciences (Sociology). At the CSB he directs projects on poverty and social policy. He has a particular focus on comparative research and an interest in methodological questions. He is expert member of Net-SILC 3, the Network for the Analysis of EU-SILC, and country team leader for Flanders of the Survey on Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE).

GERLINDE VERBIST (CSB) is Senior Researcher at the Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy. She holds a doctorate in applied economics and degrees in philosophy and political and social sciences. At the CSB she directs projects on income inequality, micro-simulation and migration. She contributed to the OECD studies ‘Growing Unequal?’ and ‘Divided we Stand’. She is a member of the EUROMOD research community and of the EQUALSOC network of excellence.

LINDE BUYSSE (CSB)

JULIE JANSSENS (CSB) studied Social-Economic Sciences at the University of Antwerp. After her studies, she joined the Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy as a phdstudent. Currently she is working fulltime on the TAKE project. Her fields of interests are the adequacy of social assistance in Belgium, the non-take-up of benefits and its effects on poverty.

SARAH MARCHAL (CSB) works at the Centre for Social Policy since 2010. Currently, she is finalizing a PhD on the design and adequacy of the social floor for the working and non-working population in the EU Member States. In October 2016, she started working on the TAKE project.

RAF VAN GESTEL (UA) is a PhD student in the Department of Economics at the University of Antwerp. His doctoral thesis applies advanced econometric methods to the healthcare sector. Current work involves the estimation of learning curves in health and the assessment of the impact of copayments on access to care and healthcare expenditures. Previously he worked as a research assistant at the Centre for European Policy Studies.

GUY VAN CAMP (FPB)

KAREL VAN DEN BOSCH (FPB)

MARITZA LOPEZ-NOVELLA (FPB) is specialised in the micro-econometric analysis of employment, unemployment and wage setting in Belgium. Part of her role within the “Labour market” team is to process the individual data provided by the various social security administrations to be used in the different forecasting models of the Federal Planning Bureau. Another part is to carry out empirical analyses based on these longitudinal databases to gain a better understanding of the functioning of the Belgian labour market and to assess policy measures. She has carried out studies on the setting and evolution of wages, including collective bargaining and wage drift, and on the impact on employment length of policies aimed at reducing wage cost and measures to extend working lives. Her current research projects include studying non-take-up of measures aiming at reducing labour costs by employers, the impact of the increase in the youth minimum wage on youth employment and the link between qualifications and unemployment duration.

ELISE BOUCQ (FPB) works as an expert at the Federal Planning Bureau. She holds a PhD in economics from the University of Lille and is specialised in econometrics, data analysis and transport economics. She joined the FPB in July 2016 to work on the TAKE project. Previously she worked as a research and teaching assistant at the University of Lille, as a researcher at the French National Institute of Research on Transport and Safety, as a senior consultant at the private company Stratec, and as a lecturer and researcher at the Haute Ecole Condorcet.

MICHIEL VAN DER HEYDEN (FPS SS) obtained a Master’s degree in political science at the university of Ghent. Since 2011 he is working for the Federal Public Service Social Security as ‘Attaché International Relations’. He works as a project manager for different projects aimed at supporting other countries with the reform and/or expansion of their social security system, this in close cooperation with the Belgian public social security institutions. In 2016 he was also appointed as the contact person for the project TAKE. In this capacity Michiel coordinates a part of the research tasks and is responsible for liaising with the relevant Belgian public social security institutions.

NATASCHA VAN MECHELEN (FPS SS) works as an expert at the Federal Public Service (FPS) Social Security. She is in particular responsible for the maintenance and use of MIMOSIS, the microsimulation model for social policy at the FPS Social Security. This model is based on administrative data from the Datawarehouse Labour Market and Social Protection, managed and maintained by the CrossRoads Bank for Social Security. Natascha Van Mechelen holds a doctorate in social sciences and has worked for a long time as a researcher at the Herman Deleeck Center for Social Policy (2000-2016).

LAURENT NISEN (ULG) works at the Panel demographics family since 2000. He conducted some research in relation to exclusion (activation in the PCSA) or aging (elder abuse), and he coordinates projects in social policies and exclusion (child poverty, no recourse to social rights) since 2011. He also keeps track of the investigation SHARE, 50 + in Europe, for the French-speaking part of Belgium. Finally, he gives courses in Sociology of aging and is part of several groups of experts (OWS, Braises, Cebud…).

JEAN-FRANCOIS REYNAERT (ULG) is researcher at the Panel Démographie Familiale, a service of the Social Sciences Institute of the University of Liège. He works on TAKE project, on SHARE survey (as coordinator for french part of Belgium) and studies IT management. Previously, he already worked on themas like poverty, disable people and ageing.

STEPHANIE LINCHET (ULG) is a sociologist and she’s working as a researcher at the Panel Démographie Familiale (Faculty of Human and Social Sciences of the University of Liège). Currently she’s working on the TAKE project and she’s coordinator for the SHARE European Survey on the French part. Her fields of research are poverty, family and ageing.

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